forgot password

encyclopedia of health Get your personal health analysis
Welcome to the Truestar Health Encyclopedia the most comprehensive information database available on health, wellness, food, nutrition, vitamins and supplements. Use of our encyclopedia will enable you to make well-informed, responsible decisions for the promotion of your own health and wellness.
Enter search items    

Cream

Illustration

Preparation, uses, and tips

Use cream strategically

Consider using cream as just an occasional indulgence.

Read labels

Pay particular attention to the amount of saturated fat. Compare products; try to find one that is moderate in saturated fats, and that also meets your cooking requirements.

Plan ahead

We now know that carbohydrates are important to the health of your heart. These come from the fruits, starches, and sweeteners that accompany the fats in cooking, so take account of the balance of all the ingredients you are using when you plan your menu. Sometimes only a little fat is required to enhance flavor.

Buying and storing tips

Cream, like milk, is highly perishable. Keep it refrigerated, and use it within a few days.

Varieties

Sweet creams products

In modern dairy production, the cream is separated by centrifugal force. The butterfat content in half-and-half is 10.5 to 18%; in light (coffee) cream, 18% to 30%; in medium cream, 25 to about 30%; in light whipping cream, 30 to 36%; and in whipping cream, 36% or more.

Sour cream products

Various types of sour cream are produced by culturing cream or milk with lactic-acid bacteria. Rennet or nonfat milk solids may be added to provide body. A variety of sour-cream products are available, but true sour cream must by definition contain at least 18% milk fat by weight. Sour half-and-half, low-fat sour cream, and light sour cream are all made with half-and-half. Fat-free sour cream is made from cultured skim milk. A cholesterol-free sour cream alternative is made with skim milk and vegetable oil.

Whipped cream

A single tablespoon of whipped cream is relatively low in saturated fat; the trick is whether any of us can actually limit ourselves to just one tablespoonful. Here are some potential strategies for reducing the intake of saturated fats:

Make whipped cream from part-skim milk or low-fat cream. Chill the milk or cream thoroughly, and use a cold bowl and beaters; serve the whipped cream within an hour. Experiment to find a naturally low-fat product that can be used as a whipped topping.

Try a range of alternatives to whipped cream. Look for unprocessed foods such as fresh yogurt, crème fraîche, and other natural foods that are low in saturated fat and carbohydrates.

Nutrition Highlights

Cream (fluid, half-and-half), 1 Tbsp
Calories: 19.5
Protein: 0.44g
Carbohydrate: 0.64g
Total Fat: 0.0g

All Indexes
Health Issues Men's Health Women's Health
Health Centers Cold, Flu, Sinus, and Allergy Diabetes Digestive System Pain and Arthritis Sports Nutrition
Safetychecker by Drug by Herbal Remedy by Supplement
Homeopathy by Remedy
Herbal Remedies by Botanical Name
Integrative Options
Foodnotes Food Guide by Food Group Vitamin Guide
Become a Sales Superstar
Learn how to earn more by selling
more and closing with higher ratios